Tag: carbon sequestration

Stuart et al. (2024): Non-mycorrhizal root-associated fungi increase soil C stocks and stability via diverse mechanisms

Emiko K. Stuart, Laura Castañeda-Gómez, Wolfram Buss, Jeff R. Powell, Yolima Carrillo IN: Biogeosciences, 21, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-21-1037-2024

Here, with the aim of identifying novel organisms that could be introduced to crop plants to promote C sequestration, the authors assessed the soil C storage potential of 12 root-associated, non-mycorrhizal fungal isolates (spanning nine genera and selected from a wide pool based on traits potentially linked to soil C accrual) and investigated fungal, plant and microbial mediators. They grew wheat plants inoculated with individual isolates in chambers allowing continuous 13C labelling. After harvest, the authors quantified C storage potential by measuring pools of different origin (plant vs. soil) and different stability with long-term soil incubations and size/density fractionation. They assessed plant and microbial community responses as well as fungal physiological and morphological traits in a parallel in vitro study.

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Nature – Zhu et al. (2024): Artificial cellulosic leaf with adjustable enzymatic CO2 sequestration capability

Xing Zhu, Chenxi Du, Bo Gao, Bin He IN: Nature Communications, 15, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-024-49320-y

In this study, the authors introduce EcoLeaf, an artificial leaf that closely mimics the characteristics of natural leaves. It harnesses visible light as its sole energy source and orchestrates the controlled expansion and contraction of stomata and the exchange of petiole materials to govern the rate of CO2 sequestration from the atmosphere. Furthermore, EcoLeaf has a cellulose composition and mechanical strength similar to those of natural leaves, allowing it to seamlessly integrate into the ecosystem during use and participate in natural degradation and nutrient cycling processes at the end of its life.

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Salvador & Doong (2024): Simultaneous achievement of energy recovery and carbon sequestration through municipal solid waste management: A review

Ruben W. Salvador, Ruey-An Doong IN: Chemosphere, 361, 142478, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2024.142478

With escalating global waste generation, there is an untapped opportunity to integrate carbon dioxide removal (CDR) technologies into existing municipal solid waste (MSW) management processes. This review explores current research on utilizing MSW for CDR, emphasizing its potential for both energy generation and carbon sequestration. The investigation covers three waste management practices: landfilling, waste-to-energy (WtE), and biochar production, revealing two paths for carbon sequestration. First, MSW serves as a feedstock in bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS), acting as a carbon-neutral resource that avoids fossil fuel and energy crop use, reducing GHG emissions and generating value through energy production. Second, direct storage of organic MSW and its derivatives, like biochar, in various carbon sinks allows for extended sequestration, offering a comprehensive approach to address the challenges of waste management and climate change mitigation.

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Verma & Reddy (2024): Review of carbon sequestration by alkaline industrial wastes: potential applications in landfill biogeochemical cover systems

Gaurav Verma, Krishna R. Reddy IN: Journal of Material Cycles and Waste Management, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10163-024-01975-x

Landfill gas, resulting from the biodegradation of municipal solid waste, mainly consists of CH4 and CO2. To counteract uncontrolled CO2 emissions from waste decomposition, an innovative, low-cost biogeochemical cover (BGCC) system for landfills utilizing biochar-amended soil and basic oxygen furnace (BOF) slag for CO2 carbonation has been developed. Despite the effectiveness of BOF slag in CO2 removal, its limited availability near landfill sites presents sustainability challenges, necessitating the search for viable alternatives within the BGCC system that can achieve efficient CO2 sequestration through direct aqueous mineral carbonation. This review explores various carbon sequestration techniques, identifying potential alkaline industrial solid wastes as substitutes for BOF slag, and evaluates these materials—namely cement kiln dust, blast furnace slag, coal fly ash, and concrete waste—for their compatibility with the BGCC system.

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Wan et al. (2024): Optimizing grazing exclusion duration for carbon sequestration in grasslands: Incorporating temporal heterogeneity of aboveground biomass and soil organic carbon

Lingfan Wan, Guohua Liu, Jian Sun, Jiaxin Ma, Hao Cheng, Yu Shen, Chenjun Du, Xukun Su IN: Science of The Total Environment 927, 172006, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2024.172006

Grasslands account for approximately one-third of the global terrestrial carbon stocks. However, a limited understanding of the impact of grazing exclusion on carbon storage in grassland ecosystems hinders progress towards restoring overgrazed grasslands and promoting carbon sequestration. In this study, the authors conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis to investigate the effects of grazing exclusion on aboveground biomass and soil organic carbon in four grasslands: alpine grasslands, tropical savannas, temperate subhumid grasslands, and a semi-desert steppe.

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Qian et al. (2024): Investigations on carbon-sequestration optimization of recycled coarse-aggregate and its effects on concrete performances

Rusheng Qian, Lin Wan-Wendner, Chengqi Yang, Ruze Zhao, Zhibo Ye, Deyu Kong, Yong Zhang IN: Journal of Building Engineering 90, 109453, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jobe.2024.109453

Recycled coarse-aggregate (RCA) derived from waste concrete can be re-used for concrete preparation, which is now limited due to its drawbacks such as micro-cracks, high-porosity, and reduced concrete strengths. To remedy these deficiencies, carbon-sequestration was employed in this study to enhance RCA and the conditions were optimized, including the temperature (20 °C–40 °C), pressure (0.1 MPa–0.3 MPa), time (5 h–24 h) and initial water content (25%–75 %).

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Qian et al. (2024): Investigations on carbon-sequestration optimization of recycled coarse-aggregate and its effects on concrete performances

Rusheng Qian, Lin Wan-Wendner, Chengqi Yang, Ruze Zhao, Zhibo Ye, Deyu Kong, Yong Zhang IN: Journal of Building Engineering, 90, 109453, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jobe.2024.109453

Recycled coarse-aggregate (RCA) derived from waste concrete can be re-used for concrete preparation, which is now limited due to its drawbacks such as micro-cracks, high-porosity, and reduced concrete strengths. To remedy these deficiencies, carbon-sequestration was employed to enhance RCA and the conditions were optimized, including the temperature (20 °C–40 °C), pressure (0.1 MPa–0.3 MPa), time (5 h–24 h) and initial water content (25%–75 %). There parameters were optimized based on the orthogonal test with scheme L9(34), which was evaluated based on RCA carbon-sequestration amount as well as its properties. With the optimized parameters, RCA was enhanced as CRCA. Both RCA and CRCA were utilized to fully replace natural coarse-aggregate (NCA) in concrete and concrete basic performances were investigated systematically, including strengths, shrinkage and medium transport properties. 

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Zhu et al. (2024): Sustainable carbon sequestration via olivine based ocean alkalinity enhancement in the east and South China Sea: Adhering to environmental norms for nickel and chromium

Tianqiang Zhu, Liwen Zheng, Feng Li, Jihua Liu, Wen Zhuang IN: Science of The Total Environment, 930, 172853, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2024.172853

This study aims to evaluate the feasibility and potential of olivine-based ocean alkalinity enhancement (OAE) for the removal of atmospheric CO2 and its storage in seawater as bicarbonates in the East and South China Seas (ESCS). A particular focus is placed on the potential ecological impacts arising from the release of nickel (Ni) and chromium (Cr) during the olivine weathering process. The authors considered two extreme scenarios: one where Ni and Cr are entirely retained in seawater, and another where they are completely deposited in sediments.

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Nature – Ngidi et al. (2024): Response of Sorghum bicolor genotypes for yield and yield components and organic carbon storage in the shoot and root systems

Asande Ngidi, Hussein Shimelis, Seltene Abady, Sandiswa Figlan, Vincent Chaplot IN: Scientific Reports 14, 9499, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-024-59956-x

Sorghum is a vital food and feed crop in the world’s dry regions. Developing sorghum cultivars with high biomass production and carbon sequestration can contribute to soil health and crop productivity. The objective of this study was to assess agronomic performance, biomass production and carbon accumulation in selected sorghum genotypes for production and breeding.

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Nature – Yu et al. (2024): Maximizing carbon sequestration potential in Chinese forests through optimal management

Zhen Yu, Shirong Liu, Haikui Li, Jingjing Liang, Weiguo Liu, Shilong Piao, Hanqin Tian, Guoyi Zhou, Chaoqun Lu, Weibin You, Pengsen Sun, Yanli Dong, Stephen Sitch, Evgenios Agathokleous IN: Nature Communications, 15, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-024-47143-5

Forest carbon sequestration capacity in China remains uncertain due to underrepresented tree demographic dynamics and overlooked of harvest impacts. In this study, the authors employ a process-based biogeochemical model to make projections by using national forest inventories, covering approximately 415,000 permanent plots, revealing an expansion in biomass carbon stock by 13.6 ± 1.5 Pg C from 2020 to 2100, with additional sink through augmentation of wood product pool (0.6-2.0 Pg C) and spatiotemporal optimization of forest management (2.3 ± 0.03 Pg C). 

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