Schlagwort: enhanced weathering

Vicca et al. (2021): Is the climate change mitigation effect of enhanced silicate weathering governed by biological processes?

Sara Vicca, Daniel Goll, Mathilde Hagens, Jens Hartmann, Ivan A. Janssens, Anna Neubeck, Josep Peñuelas, Sílvia Poblador, Jet Rijnders, Jordi Sardans, Eric Struyf, Philipp Swoboda, Jan Willem van Groenigen, Arthur Vienne, Erik Verbruggen IN: Global change Biology, 13 November 2021, doi:10.1111/gcb.15993 (open access)

A number of negative emission technologies (NETs) have been proposed to actively remove CO2 from the atmosphere, with enhanced silicate weathering (ESW) as a relatively new NET with considerable climate change mitigation potential. Here, they argue that it is likely that the climate change mitigation effect of ESW will be governed by biological processes, emphasizing the need to put these processes on the agenda of this emerging research field.

LINK

2nd International Conference on Negative CO2 Emissions, Chalmers University, Gothenburg, Sweden

Abstract submission deadline: 1 Dec. 2021

The purpose of this conference series is to bring together a wide range of scientists, experts and stakeholders, in order to engage in various aspects of research relating to negative CO2 emissions. This will include various negative emission technologies, climate modelling, climate policies and incentives. The main topics of the conference, around which the sessions will be built, include:

  • BECCS
  • Biospheric storage
  • Cross-cutting sessions
  • Direct air capture
  • Enhanced weathering
  • Modeling
  • Ocean alkalization

LINK

Video: What’s Enhanced Weathering? Interview with PhD Student Veronica Furey (The Future Forest Company)

„The Future Forest Company are co-funding Veronica Furey to study her PhD, investigating enhanced weathering at the Glenaros Estate on Mull. In this video Veronica gives us a brief insight into her studies and the potential of enhanced weathering as a negative emissions technology. Enhanced weathering is a method of removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through acceleration of naturally occurring rock mineralisation processes. It can lock away carbon for over 100,000 years, and is an extremely effective method of CO2 removal. The Future Forest company are conducting a pilot for enhanced weathering on the Glenaros Estate on Mull before we scale up across the UK. This will help us establish what particle size of rock we need, how long it will take it to dissolve, the effect it will have on the soil and the growth rate of trees, and the process we need to set up elsewhere. Veronica is interviewed by Flora. Flora is currently studying for her MSci in Science Communication at the University of Manchester, following her undergraduate degree in Biology. Flora’s particularly concerned with environmental issues including climate change and the effects of deforestation.“

LINK

Swoboda, Philipp; et al. (2021): Remineralizing soils? The agricultural usage of silicate rock powders: A review

Swoboda, Philipp; Döring, Thomas F.; Hamer, Martin (2021): Remineralizing soils? The agricultural usage of silicate rock powders: A review. In Science of the Total Environment, p. 150976. DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.150976.

„Soil nutrient depletion threatens global food security and has been seriously underestimated for potassium (K) and several micronutrients. This is particularly the case for highly weathered soils in tropical countries, where classical soluble fertilizers are often not affordable or not accessible. One way to replenish macro- and micronutrients are ground silicate rock powders (SRPs). Rock forming silicate minerals contain most nutrients essential for higher plants, yet slow and inconsistent weathering rates have restricted their use in the past. Recent findings, however, challenge past agronomic objections which insufficiently addressed the factorial complexity of the weathering process. This review therefore first presents a framework with the most relevant factors for the weathering of SRPs through which several outcomes of prior studies can be explained.“

LINK

Gernon, Thomas M.; et al. (2021): Global chemical weathering dominated by continental arcs since the mid-Palaeozoic

Gernon, Thomas M.; Hincks, Thea K.; Merdith, Andrew S.; Rohling, Eelco J.; Palmer, Martin R.; Foster, Gavin L. et al. (2021): Global chemical weathering dominated by continental arcs since the mid-Palaeozoic. In: Nat. Geosci. 28, S. 611. DOI: 10.1038/s41561-021-00806-0.

„Earth’s plate-tectonic activity regulates the carbon cycle and, hence, climate, via volcanic outgassing and silicate-rock weathering. Mountain building, arc–continent collisions and clustering of continents in the tropics have all been invoked as controlling the weathering flux, with arcs also acting as a major contributor of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. However, these processes have largely been considered in isolation when in reality they are all tightly coupled. To properly account for interactions among these processes, and the inherent multi-million-year time lags at play in the Earth system, we need to characterize their complex interdependencies. Here we analyse these interdependencies over the past 400 million years using a Bayesian network to identify primary relationships, time lags and drivers of the global chemical weathering signal.“

LINK

Renforth, P.; Campbell, J. S. (2021): The role of soils in the regulation of ocean acidification

Renforth, P.; Campbell, J. S. (2021): The role of soils in the regulation of ocean acidification. In Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences 376 (1834), p. 20200174. DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2020.0174.

„Increasing the alkalinity levels in the ocean through enhanced weathering could help to ameliorate the effects of ocean acidification in two ways. First, enhanced weathering would slightly elevate the pH of drainage waters, and the receiving coastal waters. The elevated pH would result in an increase in carbonate mineral saturation states, and a partial reversal in the effects of elevated CO2. Second, the increase in alkalinity would help to replenish the ocean’s buffering capacity by maintaining the ‘Revelle Factor’, making the oceans more resilient to further CO2 emissions. However, there is limited research on the downstream and oceanic impacts of enhanced weathering on which to base deployment decisions.“

LINK

Goll, Daniel S.; et al. (2021): Potential CO2 removal from enhanced weathering by ecosystem responses to powdered rock

Goll, Daniel S.; Ciais, Philippe; Amann, Thorben; Buermann, Wolfgang; Chang, Jinfeng; Eker, Sibel et al. (2021): Potential CO2 removal from enhanced weathering by ecosystem responses to powdered rock. In Nat. Geosci., pp. 1–5. DOI: 10.1038/s41561-021-00798-x.

“ Here we explore soil amendment with powdered basalt in natural ecosystems.“

LINK

Goll, Daniel S.; et al. (2021): Potential CO2 removal from enhanced weathering by ecosystem responses to powdered rock

Goll, Daniel S.; Ciais, Philippe; Amann, Thorben; Buermann, Wolfgang; Chang, Jinfeng; Eker, Sibel et al. (2021): Potential CO2 removal from enhanced weathering by ecosystem responses to powdered rock. In Nat. Geosci., pp. 1–5. DOI: 10.1038/s41561-021-00798-x.

„Here we explore soil amendment with powdered basalt in natural ecosystems.“

LINK