Schlagwort: enhanced weathering

Almaraz et al. (2022): Methods for determining the CO2 removal capacity of enhanced weathering in agronomic settings

Maya Almaraz, Nina L. Bingham, Iris O. Holzer, Emily K. Geoghegan, Heath Goertzen, Jaeeun Sohng, Benjamin Z. Houlton IN: Front. Clim., https://doi.org/10.3389/fclim.2022.970429

Drawing on geologic and agronomic literature, as well as demonstration-scale research on quantifying EW, the authors provide an overview of (1) existing literature on EW experimentation as a CO2 removal technique, (2) agronomic and geologic approaches to studying EW in field settings, (3) the scientific bases and tradeoffs behind various techniques for quantifying CO2 removal and other relevant methodologies, and (4) the attributes of effective stakeholder engagement for translating scientific research in action.

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te Pas et al. (2023): Assessment of the enhanced weathering potential of different silicate minerals to improve soil quality and sequester CO2

Emily E. E. M. te Pas, Mathilde Hagens, Rob N. J. Comans IN: Front. Clim., https://doi.org/10.3389/fclim.2022.954064

The authors compared the enhanced weathering potential of olivine (Mg2SiO4), basalt, wollastonite (CaSiO3), and two minerals that are novel in this context, anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8) and albite (NaAlSi3O8). A down-flow soil column experiment was designed allowing for measurements on soils and leachate, and calculations of organic and inorganic carbon budgets.

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Wood et al. (2023): Impacts of dissolved phosphorus and soil-mineral-fluid interactions on CO2 removal through enhanced weathering of wollastonite in soil

Cameron Wood, Anna L. Harrison, Ian M. Power IN: Applied Geochemistry 148, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeochem.2022.105511.

The results of this study indicate that adsorption to soils may limit the ability of P to enhance wollastonite weathering, that silicate weathering behaviour within soils differs substantially from that of pure mineral phases, and that CO2 budgets must be carefully constrained to assess the source of stored CO2.

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How CDR with rock weathering can be done practically and profitably (Part 1)

on carbon-drawdown.de/blog

„The Enhanced Rock Weathering (ERW) pilot project with 1217 tons of basalt demonstrates the full value chain for ERW at € 230 per ton of CO₂ (with € 100-150 in sight). In Part 1 of this blog post series Carbon Drawdown Initiative describe the concepts, in-field work and financials all the way until the certification. Part 2, coming soon, will be about the sale process for the certificates that they have created.“

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Report: Olivine weathering in field trials – Effect of natural environmental conditions on mineral dissolution and the potentialtoxicity of nickel

Jos Vink, Daniel Giesen, Edvard Ahlrichs, Deltares, 62 p. 11204378-000-BGS-0002, 24 November 2022

The CO-Action project targeted the obstructions for the use of olivine to capture CO2 such as scientific knowledge gaps that inhibited the estimation of mineral weathering rates, and addresses the bottlenecks for large scale applications in natural environments. Main obstructions are: 1) uncertainty of weathering rates of olivine under natural conditions; 2) toxicity risks of nickel that is incorporated in the mineral and is released upon weathering. A two-year field experiment was conducted in the Netherlands to study mineral weathering rates under various conditions. Variables were: mineral source (Norwegian and Spanish olivine, Canadian wollastonite), type of application (on-top versus mixed-in), availability of moisture (rain-fed versus wet), and effect of vegetation (planted versus non-planted).

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Project Carbdown’s next step: We will set up a large scale greenhouse experiment with hundreds of pots

on carbon-drawdown.de

Carbdown set up an extensive greenhouse experiment involving hundreds of pots (and lysimeters which collect the leachate waters) filled with different mixtures of soils, basalt rock dusts and plants. Their goal is to conduct experiments such that the team can sample for all known (and yet unknown) ERW analytical approaches. This way, all measurements will be from the same set-up, the same water, the same soil and under the same environmental conditions. This should enable Carbdown to find out whether the measurement approaches converge on the same CDR rates. Or at least it should let them get closer to the answers.

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Cox et al. (2022): Deliberating enhanced weathering: Public frames, iconic ecosystems and the governance of carbon removal at scale

Cox, E., Spence, E., & Pidgeon, N. IN: Public Understanding of Science, 31(8), 960–977. https://doi.org/10.1177/09636625221112190

Public perceptions of enhanced rock weathering and its wider social and environmental implications will be a critical factor determining its potential; the authors use six 2-day deliberative workshops in England, Wales and Illinois to understand public views. Consideration of enhanced rock weathering deployment in tropical countries led participants to frame it from a social justice perspective, which had been much less prevalent when considering Western agricultural contexts, and generated assumptions of increased scale, which heightened concerns about detrimental social and environmental impacts.

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Oppon et al. (2023): Macro-level economic and environmental sustainability of negative emission technologies – Case study of crushed silicate production for enhanced weathering

Eunice Oppon, Justin S. Richter, S.C. Lenny Koh, Hellen Nabayiga IN: Ecological Economics 204, Part A, 107636, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2022.107636.

The need to conduct sustainability assessments for enhanced weathering systems in addition to validated technical feasibility remains a relevant research gap. In this work, the potential economic and environmental impacts associated with production of crushed silicates is assessed for eight countries, belonging to two separate groups: emerging economies (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) and developed economies (USA, UK, France, and Germany).

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Company Silicate: Storing carbon for 100,000 years

„Company Silicate will utilize returned concrete to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. The startup based in Ireland is on a mission to durably and safely remove 1 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere by 2040 through enhanced weathering. Maurice Bryson of Silicate and Professor Frank McDermott of University College Dublin decided to employ their collective experience in geochemistry, agriculture and carbon finance to deliver a robust, science-based, and permanent carbon removal solution to help maintain a habitable planet.“

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